natural-health-information-centre
Heart Disease

Omega-3

Glycemic Index

Harmful Chemicals

SARS

HIV / AIDS

Sunburn

Natural Medicine

Books

Contact Us

News

Links

Site Directory

Natural Health Blog

About Us

Link to Us



Stay up to date with our newsletter Email

Name

Then

Don't worry -- your e-mail address is totally secure.
I promise to use it only to send you Natural Health News.

Boron, the trace element that may prevent osteoporosis and oseoarthritis

Boron, although it is present only in minute amounts, has been linked to significant improvements in both osteoporosis and osteoarthritis. Whilst the processes involved are not yet completely understood, it is likely that they involve boron's effects on both Vitamin D and Oestrogen.

It would appear that Boron is particularly important for the activation of Vitamin D, which controls the absorption and utilisation of calcium in the body, converting inactive Vitamin D into it's most active form.

In addition, research has shown that Boron, when given to post-menopausal women has a significant effect on reducing the amount of calcium that is lost in the urine, probably by its actions on oestrogen.

Consequently, most of the Boron found in the body is found in the bones, although same is also found in the thyroid glands and associated organs.

Functions of Boron in the body

  • Activation of Vitamin D
  • Prevention of osteoporosis
  • Prevention and treatment of osteoarthritis

Boron deficiency

Boron deficiency has been shown to have a marked effect on the amount of calcium excreted in the urine, particularly of postmenopausal women. As it is not a component of modern fertilizers, it is likely that produce from modern farms is lacking in Boron due to soil depletion. In contrast, produce from organic farms is much less likely to be Boron deficient, due to the natural fertilization methods used.

Symptoms of Boron deficiency

Bone / joint disease
Depression
Heightened effects of stress (also thought to affect calcium levels)

Association with other minerals and vitamins

Activated Vitamin D, may affect oestrogen levels.

Normal amounts of Boron in the diet

No Normal level of Boron has yet been established, however doses of up to 3mg/day have been shown to be non-toxic.

Sources of dietary Boron

Boron is mostly found in fruits, vegetables, nuts and pulses, presuming they have been farmed on soil with an adequate boron content. Rich sources (in descending order) are:

Soybeans
Prunes
Raisins
Almonds
Peanuts
Hazelnuts
Dates
Red Wine

Boron supplements

Some multivitamin supplements include Boron. It can also be bought as sodium borate, boron chelates or sodium tetraborate decahydrate, all of which are fairly well absorbed and bioavailable.

Back from Boron to trace elements

Related Links

Antioxidants
Amino-acids
Carbohydrates
Essential fatty acids
Fats
Minerals
Plant extracts
Proteins
Trace elements
Vitamins


2002-2007 Copyright All Rights Reserved
www.Natural-Health-Information-Centre.com
Disclaimer Contact us

Health Information

Avoiding bird-flu - How to escape the promised avian flu pandemic

All about Natural Health -
Our best selling guide to Natural Health

Donate for a FREE ebook


Natural Health

Glycemic index

Nutritional supplements

Vitamins & Minerals

Womens health

Cholesterol
  - lowering your cholesterol
  - High cholesterol diet
  - Healthy cholesterol levels

Heart Disease

Diets

Cancers

Omega 3

Hydrogenated fats

Arthritis

Aspartame

Beast Cancer Bracelets

Hydrogenated fats

Food Additives

Sunburn

Trans fats

Weight Management


Sponsored links